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really avert the fiscal cliff 4908% of american families, at least when it comes to income tax. and it's necessary. we know what happened over the last several decades when it comes to progressivity, income inequality in our country. it's the worst it's been in almost 90 years. through 1980 and 2005, in a 25 year period in time, more than 80% of total increase of american income went to the wealthiest 1%. since the recession ended, more than 90% of the income growth in america has gone to the top 1%, while the media income to the middle class has declined to i could go on and give illustrations. i don't think i need to. at least to this group, but i will tell you when we address the issue of revenue and taxes, i have insisted in every meeting i've been in from simpson-bowles to all the games, but it has to at least protect their current progressivity of the tax code, if not improved for those of lower income categories. i think that's a starting principle for those. the second thing is that we must insist on is to protect the safety net for america. make no mistake. as good as we are t
significant, the biggest stumbling block on the road to the fiscal cliff, that difference between tax rates for the wealthiest americans. and what house democrats announced they're going to try to do is an end run around the house gop to try to file a petition in order to try to push a vote on the house floor to just raise taxes -- excuse me, to just extend the bush-era tax rates for middle class americans. but to do that, as you know, they need 218 votes and there's still a very sizable republican majority in the house. it will be difficult for democrats to do that. >> absolutely. and that proposal to take away what has been historically a congressional prerogative was a little bit surprising even to people who have been reading about this stuff for years. is it true though, dana, as it has been in past years that both sides at least have to show their bases that they're fighting the good fight and that's part of what's going on here? >> reporter: absolutely. there's no question about it. what i mention in the piece really is a real phenomenon here when it comes to the feeling among congre
. >>> the standoff over the fiscal cliff is putting jobs here in california and alison burns has more on this. >> reporter: and secretary panetta has warned the fiscal cliff would hurt our national defense. he's expected to hold a news conference any minute now. he's getting the order from the white house to brace for massive budget cut us. now, the automatic spending cuts that would kick in if congress does not reach an agreement on the fiscal cliff would force the pentagon to slice about 10% of the budget. the defense industry projects one in five defense contracts in california would be lost. the aerospace industry is projecting that 135,000 department jobs would be cut along with 90,000 jobs for a total of about 225,000 jobs lost in california over the next few years. alison burns, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> 8:16. well, today will mark the 9 oth annual lighting of the national christmas tree. president obama and his family, they will flip a switch lighting that tree this evening. neil patrick harris, remember doogie howser? he will be hosting the event. james taylor and the fray will be amo
parties can't get together to come to agreement on avoiding the fiscal cliff. it's as if some are in denial that there was an election and that the president won reelection. and that a whole bunch of us won reelection to the senate and to the house. it's as if the ideological rigidity is still indoctrinaire. and the lesson as that the people were telling us about -- and the lessons that the people were telling us about bipartisanship, that they demand bipartisanship, as if the parties and their leaders didn't understand that that's what the american people were demanding. and here, as the drumbeat grows louder as we approach december 31st and falling off the fiscal cliff. now, there's an easy cliff, whatever your ideology and your approach to this. it can be hammered out next year when we are doing major things, such as a rewrite of the i.r.s. tax code and all that that can portend in producing revenue. by making the code more streamlined and in the process get rid of a lot of the underbrush, loopholes, utilize that revenue to lower rates. but that's for another day after long
with both parties to find common ground. solving the fiscal cliff in a that addresses the true drivers of our debt and saves american jobs will be a great way for the president to start his second term and for the good of our country and my colleagues, we're ready to work with the president to achieve those goals. >> mr. speaker, a couple of things. first, on the issue of tax rates, are you willing to accept no deal that includes some increase in the top tax rates? and i'm also wondering, what our final deadline is on this. >> increasing tax rates draws money away from our economy that needs to be invested in our economy to put the american people back to work. it's the wrong approach. we're willing to put revenues on the table but revenues that come from closing loopholes, getting rid of special interest deduckses and not raising rates we think is better for the economy, pure and simple. secondly, the american people expect us to find common ground, to work together and to resolve this and frankly sooner is better than later. >> you've been doing this for a long time. can you be candi
up on the wealthiest americans. and i don't really see them doing that. >> if the republicans say sorry, no way are we going to raise rates on the wealthy, you guys are willing to go off the fiscal cliff? >> if republicans are not willing to let rates go back up, and we think they should go back to the clinton levels, a time when the american economy is doing exceptionally well, then there will not be an agreement. >> but house speaker john bigger is digging in himself, admitting talks are going nowhere. speaker boehner also described the moment when secretary geithner first showed him the president's opening offer. >> i was just flabbergasted. i looked at him and said, "you can't be serious." i've just never seen anything like it. you know, we've got seven weeks between election day and the end of the year. and three of those weeks have been wasted with this nonsense. right now i would say we're nowhere, period. we're nowhere. we've put a serious offer on the table by putting revenues up there to try to get this question resolved. but the white house has responded with virtually
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6